New Patient: Victor Frankenstein

Initial Consultation with New Patient:  Frankenstein, Victor 

New Patient:  Victor FrankensteinBASIC INFORMATION

Name:  Victor Frankenstein

Sex:  Male

Age: Approximately 22

Employment:  Student at Ingolstadt University majoring in neuroscience with minor in torturing animals.

REASON FOR VISIT

Patient complains of fatigue, lack of appetite, and sleep deprivation. See depression.

Patient insists that he is being followed by an eight-foot monster.  See paranoia. 

Patient insists that this monster was created with his own hands…in a small dorm room.  See God-complex.

Patient shows signs of severe panic and fears that the monster will kill his loved ones.  See Panic Disorder/Flight or Fight.

Patient suffering from insomnia due to compulsive personality in his quest to “create life.”  See OCD and Delusions of Grandeur.

FAMILY HISTORY:

One of three sons.  Youngest brother recently murdered.  One adopted sister.  

Mother died before onset of illness.

Father holds powerful position with government. 

(Note:  Patient’s mother adopted a young female (patient’s sister) and presented her to him as a “gift” with the words “here is a pretty present for my Victor.”   See feelings of possession adding to God-complex.

Patient is to be wed to his “sister.”  Patient states that the wedding night will surely cause his death.  See Incest/Fear of Intimacy.  

NOTES/POSSIBILE DIAGNOSIS

Patient may suffer from Spilt Personality Disorder with his alter-ego being an “eight-foot-tall monster.” Patient claims that he and this monster have met face-to-face (See hallucinations) and that the monster speaks in a threatening tone.  Patient claims they meet in only the remotest of places.  Patient claims that the monster is well-read in the classics and is said to have educated himself.  “He likes to read Milton.”  

Patient is convinced that the monster is not a figment of his imagination.  When confronted with the fact that no one other than the patient has seen this enormous monster, the patient trembled slightly then offered “Hey, I’ve read Paradise Lost!  Have YOU read anything by Milton, Miss Smartypants?”  On replying that I have not in fact read Paradise Lost, he spat on my shoe and told me to go and “get a REAL education.”  See OD  (Oppositional Disorder).  

In a final attempt to reach his sensibilities, I again asked why no one else has seen the monster in question (except for an alleged narrator who’s been “living on a ship that’s currently stuck in ice somewhere in the North Pole”), he quickly jumped up, told me he needed to get some sleep, and climbed out the window.      

OF CONCERN

Patient refers to himself as the “murderer of William, of Justine, and of Clerval.”

ACTION

Arrange intervention with patient’s friend, Clerval.    

Alert authorities.  

Patient is a danger to himself. 

Danger to society.

Dangerous!

Report by Mary C. M. Phillips, Ph.b.,
(Psychobabble consultant
for The DJABC Institute)

 

*Photo: Paper and Pen by Orin Zebest, obtained through Flickr Creative Commons 

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  • Not to mention that he abandons his middle brother Earnest, leaving him completely alone, to go on his mission “assigned by Heaven” to pursue the creature through the harshest conditions. He even looses touch with reality confusing his dreams with reality, and being encouraged by conversations with his dead wife.

  • Oh my soul, yes, Frankenstein is all of these! Great post, Mary, as usual!

  • MaryCMP

    While reading this book and seeing the tragic aftermath on the news in Aurora, I couldn’t help but make the connection. Frankenstein is probably better the third time around, don’t you think?

    • Each time I find new things to think about. It is rich that way.